Dustin M . Hoffman on The Red Book or Operation Iraqi Freedom is My Fault

Dustin M. Hoffman and I go way back and I have talked about that so many times that I am running out of stuff to say other than that I am extremely grateful to have him as a friend when things are going well for me and when things aren't going so well.

His book of stories One-Hundred-Knuckled Fist won The Prairie Schooner Book Prize recently and it is an amazing collection that talks about trades' people and their families and how they continue to live in America when the work dries up. The book is, of course, more than that, but I think framing it as a book about Americans who are hurting because they aren't given opportunities to get back on their feet is as good a way as any. 

You should buy and read his book. Do so by clicking the button below:

Here is a picture of Dustin from when he was painting stuff back before the housing crises began.

Here is a picture of Dustin from when he was painting stuff back before the housing crises began.

Now that you have bought and read Dustin's book, here is what he had to say about The Red Book or Operation Iraqi Freedom is My Fault.

Brandon Davis Jennings gives us the book about war we’ve been missing, one where war crumbles from neatly packaged binaries of heroes and villains, gore and glory, bravery and cowardice. Instead, Jennings shows us a uniquely human workaday perspective. War is a job with a desk and an ironed uniform, performed by a kid struggling to understand why Bin Laden wants to kill him. To combat dehumanizing bureaucracy, Brandon strips the essay form bare and reshapes it as a weapon of the heart aimed at rescuing identity and emotional vulnerability from the thrumming machines of war and masculinity. The Red Book is a masterpiece of humor and honesty and a voice so strong it spills into endnotes and splits in half. In these tightly connected essays, Jennings invites us to laugh at him, but instead we meditate with him on how we might make sense of an abusive world. Jennings’s essays are the gauze for so many of America’s wounds.
— Dustin M. Hoffman, author of One-Hundred-Knuckled Fist